I realized a while ago that the upper body has a “core” similar to the role played by the lower body “core”, namely the abs, obliques and lower back. For the lower body, those muscle groups act to cancel out movement in the midsection and to create a stable platform for the legs to move around.

Just like focusing on maintaining a strong, stable mid-section improves lower body function and strength, focusing on the Upper Body Core has the same affect on the shoulders and neck. In this video I explain where the Upper Body Core is and how to use it to improve your shoulder stability, neck position and upper body strength both in the gym and on the bike.

-James Wilson-

22 thoughts on “Don’t forget your Upper Body Core…

  1. David M Owen says:

    Really enjoy all your work out stuff, as for colors I would go with matter black, yellow, and yes pink. ( for the ladies ). Good luck with them

  2. Lukas says:

    I assume more pins is more money? What you have across the front and back looks a little excessive to me and sparse toward the middle, but maybe you don’t actually need any in the middle. I have nine pins in out of possible 10 threaded holes, so I’d say 10-12 pins per side should be plenty.

    Great name (company and first product) and excellent logo! Good luck!

    • bikejames says:

      I’m not doing any work with the oval chainrings, I just like them and thought everyone should know that they are worth looking at. Hope you like the pedals as much as I do, I’m really excited to get them into people’s hands.

  3. Brady C says:

    James I love the pedals! I wear a size 14 shoe and dig the large platform. I switched to flats at the beginning of this year because of your suggestions and love them! As far as my opinion on pins, I like the idea of having options and being able to customize their location depending on my riding style and foot position. As for colors the basics of course like black, red, and silver, but I also would like to see some hyper green or orange choices.

  4. David M Owen says:

    Really enjoy all your work out stuff, as for colors I would go with matter black, yellow, and yes pink. ( for the ladies ). Good luck with them

  5. Lukas says:

    I assume more pins is more money? What you have across the front and back looks a little excessive to me and sparse toward the middle, but maybe you don’t actually need any in the middle. I have nine pins in out of possible 10 threaded holes, so I’d say 10-12 pins per side should be plenty.

    Great name (company and first product) and excellent logo! Good luck!

    • bikejames says:

      The pins don’t impact the final cost, I’m just curious if riders would prefer to have all of the pins and then have the option to run them all or take some out and set it up the way they like – have some options in other words – or would they rather just have a set pin pattern.

      And yes, with this design you don’t need as many pins in the center. In fact, my prototypes didn’t have any. Since your foot is balanced the pressure is on the front and back edge of the pedal and you really start to use the heel to drive your pedal stroke. It also keeps your foot from wanting to push over the top and come off while pedaling – once your foot is where you want it it stays there.

      Glad you like the name and product so far, hope you like it on the trail even more.

    • bikejames says:

      You have 5 inches of contact space for your foot, which is more than any other pedal on the market. They are also no wider than a normal flat so they are smaller underfoot than every other “oversized” flat as well. I’ve tried almost every pedal design on the market and this one is noticeably different. But of course I am biased…

      • Greg Hart says:

        Hey James,
        Love your move into the MTB component market. It smacks of you ‘putting your money where your mouth is’ and I know this innovative pedal will close a few mouths in the clipless pedal camp. I was out riding today and running a light hardtail with a Enduro/gravity set up. Looking to get loose in the corners pushing out the hips and I really love to dab the inner foot out for confidence in the drift mid corner. The problem with this is, because I ride flats, of course, relocating my foot on the pedal takes precious seconds and if not bang on reduces pedal power out of corners and by extension body position for the next corner. Ideas come easy to me and I have commericalised a few. Anyway the idea I have for your next pedal ‘maybe’ if you like it has a DH/Enduro focus. My idea targets this issue of re-positioning the foot after a dab and being able to automatically position the pedal back into the optimal/predicable placement zone using possibly a sprung cam system embedded in the shaft or external mechanism to the pedal itself. Not sure haven’t thought that far. Anyway the basic idea is that as the pedal already stays in a relative flat position during peddling, having a mechanical mechanism that keeps it in the optimal zone when the foot is removed isn’t a big departure from this. (I am sure this type of mechanism has been used in products already) A little extra weight, but I am sure the DH guys won’t mind and it puts more technology into the pedal to generate higher level of performance and predicability. On top of it being one less thing to worry/focus on when you are nailing down your favourite section of trail. Anyway James let me know what you think. Do you think it could be your next ‘Innovation’?
        Cheers, Greg

  6. Brady C says:

    James I love the pedals! I wear a size 14 shoe and dig the large platform. I switched to flats at the beginning of this year because of your suggestions and love them! As far as my opinion on pins, I like the idea of having options and being able to customize their location depending on my riding style and foot position. As for colors the basics of course like black, red, and silver, but I also would like to see some hyper green or orange choices.

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