Here is a video I shot this morning showing my workout crew the Hanging Leg Raise, an exercise I picked up from Pavel’s Naked Warrior program. This is a great core training exercise for working the hip needed on the trail. Enjoy!

-James Wilson-

12 thoughts on “Hanging Leg Raises for Mountain Biking

  1. Ole Dines Olsen says:

    Good article, I have thought about the same thing myself, and have a question in that regard. What are your thoughts about hardtail riding and weight on the handlebars? My thought is that when the track becomes bumpy, more pressure on the handlebar and therefore less weight on the rear end of the bike would work best. Obvious exception when you need to pull the front end over obstacles. The risk with too heavy front end would of course be OTB.

  2. Ole Dines Olsen says:

    First thanks for your interesting posts and articles, really appreciate your energy and time put into this.

    Next specific to the above topic: what are your thoughts regarding hardtails? I would guess you’d need more weight on the hands to easen the passage across bumps, roots and rocks.

  3. Ole Dines Olsen says:

    Good article, I have thought about the same thing myself, and have a question in that regard. What are your thoughts about hardtail riding and weight on the handlebars? My thought is that when the track becomes bumpy, more pressure on the handlebar and therefore less weight on the rear end of the bike would work best. Obvious exception when you need to pull the front end over obstacles. The risk with too heavy front end would of course be OTB.

    • bikejames says:

      I agree, on a hardtail you need to be able to shift your weight forward even more often. You still want to strive for that “neutral” position of having some weight/ pressure on your hands but being able to shift your weight forward to take some weight off the rear end is certainly part of riding a hardtail smoothly. And the risk of going OTB is a bit overblown, you can very quickly and easily get your weight back and being a little in front of the bike actually makes it easier and faster to un-weight/ lift the front end, making it less likely that you will just smack into something that will send you OTB.

      • brian says:

        Riding is a continuous movement as the body to complete it. Listen to your body feedback is essential. If you get numbness in your wrist/finger there is over stress at these points. Overcome that by strengthing core to keep these stresses less. You have to make a concious effort to override bad habits. I have learned a lot about my riding style this season. Biomechanic feedback and the correct response will make a difference. James thanks for taking me back to basics. I have gotten stronger and ridden away low back pains, should pains. I will keep working core exercises that will enhance other body mechanics.
        Brian

  4. Ole Dines Olsen says:

    First thanks for your interesting posts and articles, really appreciate your energy and time put into this.

    Next specific to the above topic: what are your thoughts regarding hardtails? I would guess you’d need more weight on the hands to easen the passage across bumps, roots and rocks.

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