It seems that a lot of riders were pretty pumped on the 5 Movement Tips to Improve Your Cornering Technique article/ video I posted last week. I got a lot of great feedback from riders who were starting to see the importance of driving their cornering from their hips and not the bike.

In my opinion the confusion stems from riders who don’t understand movement trying to interpret what they see the pros doing.

However, I also got a couple of questions about the  importance of switching your feet when entering a corner and the role of “dropping the cranks” in cornering.

The confusion is based on some common cornering advice that is a perfect example of someone misinterpreting the movement behind the technique.

I shot this video to address these questions and explain why switching your feet is more efficient – and when you should keep the same foot forward – as well as the role of shifting the hips instead of simply dropping the cranks. Hopefully it clears up some of the confusion behind what you see pro DH riders do and what is actually driving what you see them do.

Again, in my opinion the confusion stems from riders who don’t understand movement trying to interpret what they see the pros doing. Since they don’t understand the movements behind the techniques they teach the techniques themselves but they often get the real cause of the technique wrong.

For example, shifting the hips causes the cranks to drop but if you don’t know that then all you see are the cranks dropping. You then then misinterpret what you are seeing as the dropping of the cranks as what drives the technique.

But if you start to focus on “drop the cranks” instead of “shift the hips” then you can easily get confused as to what is really going on.

Hope this makes sense. The real test is to try it out for yourself and see.

If you have any questions or thoughts about this video please feel free to post a comment below and if you liked it please click one of the Like or Share buttons below to help spread the word.

Until next time…

Ride Strong,

James Wilson

MTB Strength Training Systems

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